Feb 26

rostrum1.jpg
Mark Weiner on the 110 Footer, Slackline Brothers Inc. © 2006

The Rostrum fomation in Yosemite National Park is currently the largest highline court, with 4 different rigging options! Ranging from 20 to 110 feet long, there is a line for everybody!

Approach: From Yosemite Valley, drive out towards Wawona (Highway 41). Once you pass the tunnel shortly after leaving the valley, there will be a pullout to park at. From here hike towards the cliff and locate the Rostrum.

Rigging: There are bolts for the 20 foot line, the 80 foot line, and the 110 line. Large cams are needed in a flaring crack to make an anchor for the 60 foot line. If you are going to set up here, or even climb here, make sure that it is not closed due to Peregrine Falcon nesting. It is often closed, but is usually open in the fall.

rostrum2.jpgShawn Snyder on the 60 Footer, Slackline Brothers Inc. © 2006

The Warm-Up Line - 20 ft. long - 1000 feet above the valley floor

First walk: unknown

The 60 Footer - 60 ft. long - 1000 feet above the valley floor

First walk: unknown

The 80 Footer - 80 ft. long - 1000 feet above the valley floor

First walk: unknown

The 110 Footer - 110 ft. long - 1000 feet above the valley floor

First walk: Shawn Snyder, summer 2003

The possibility of serious injury or death is inherent in any activity involving motion or height such as climbing, surfing, skating and slacklining. The equipment and activity discussed on this site are intended for use by properly trained, qualified participants under supervised conditions willing to personally assume all risks and responsibilities associated with slacklining, for which Slackline Brothers, Inc. absolves itself of all liability. Know that this information is mostly heresay, as we have not visited each highline destination. Before highlining, know your limitations and the limit of your equipment, and asses FOR YOURSELF the conditions of the anchors. Your rig and your safety are your responsibility, not ours! There is a good chance the information posted here is erroneous, and existing anchors may not be safe. Keep your equipment in good working condition. Test for loose fittings or fibers and or damage before each use. Always use a leash, or tether when highlining, and avoid falling whenever possible, especially when your falling zone is not clear of obstructions! Serious injuries/death may very well result from highlining. No one may reproduce any of the material on this site without previous consent by Slackline Brothers inc., and its authors.

Slackline.com and its design are ©2006 Slackline Brothers Inc.


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