Aug 27

Jon Ritson of Leeds England has recently made an honorable attempt at a new record for the longest and highest highline in England.

The news report can be viewed here:

Congratulations on the publicity Jon! Best of luck in future records!




Aug 27

Typically, slacklines range from 15-50 feet for those just getting into the sport. However, if an extra challenge and thrill is desired, long lines can prove to be extremely difficult. Anything over 100 feet requires increased concentration, balance, and skill. Because of this added difficulty, many people have embraced long slacklines in the same way that they embrace highlines; it creates the necessity to be completely focused. Many notable slackliners have pursued long slacklines, but only in recent years have attempts been made to set a “world record”.

The first known attempt to establish a world record slackline was made by Heinz Zak in August of 2005. He is believed to be the first person to successfully walk a 100 meter (328 feet) slackline. This is now the idealistic goal for many longline walkers. The magic of the 100 meter line draws many people in.

This record stood for nearly two years, until Slackline maven Damian Cooksey (also known for landing the first frontflip on a slackline, among other accomplishments) walked a longer line in 2007. On march 4th of that year he successfully rigged and walked a 405 foot line in Poland. The video of this walk can be seen below:

About two months later, this record was broken, as Andreas Thoelke walked a 443 foot line on May 31st. Not to be outdone, Damian walked a 506 foot line on July 10th, 2007, smashing the old record and leaving a lot to work up to for slackliners to come.

The dangers of long lines

The dangers of long lines

Long lines should not be taken lightly though. The forces involved in rigging lines of such length are staggering, and any gear failure at these tensions can cause severe injury. I know from personal experience what this looks like (see left)

Surely the record will be broken again in the future. Who knows what we are capable of? Only time can tell. Talk has already begun of lines longer than 700 feet. (Yes there are pieces of continuous webbing that long).















Aug 27

This is a youtube video of Kristina at the 2008 Bisik Slackline Festival. We believe that she may be the youngest person to walk a highline (at age 10).

Congratulations Kristina! That is quite an accomplishment!




Aug 26

The Humboldt Classic Slackline Comp

The Humboldt Classic Slackline Comp

The Humboldt Classic is the first slackline competition ever to be held in Arcata, CA or even Northern California for that matter.

There will be two 30 foot (9 meters) slacklines set up. Each competitor has a 3 minute session during the trials and semifinals. During the finals the final competitors will have two 3 minute sessions. Prior to any session a competitor has the option to adjust tension to a preferred setting, which can also be changed during his/her run if desired. Once the session has started, the competitor has 3 minutes to show his/her skills. At the end of the round, all participants will be asked to write down the top three competitors excluding his/her self, and submit it to the gym owner. The voted winners will move on to the next round and so forth. There will be prizes for all divisions.

Props are allowed but keep in mind this is slacklining and not a circus. If you have a question about the use of props, send us an email at catalysticproductions@gmail.com.




Aug 14

Potter’s revolutionary attempt to make the first Base Line: walking a slackline 400 feet in the air with only a B.A.S.E. parachute protecting him from a deadly fall. Pretty radical stuff.

Potter\'s BASEline

Potter's BASEline


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Aug 6

By Robin Avery
HevyFest 2008

HevyFest 2008

Recently, as you may have noticed, the sport of slackline has been exploding in popularity. It’s been all over the news, in Nike commercials, college campuses, and city parks. In the past few weeks I have been taking part in weekly slackline sessions with local Vancouver slackline enthusiasts. (If you’re in the Vancouver area, we meet at Kitsilano Beach every Monday at 6pm, come on down!) While slacklining on the beach one evening durring the Vancouver Folk Fest a friend mentioned there was an upcoming slackline festival in Squamish. So I went.

This festival was definitely not your typical festival. If you’re not familiar with Squamish, many describe it as the the Yosemite counterpart of Canada. There is a lifetime of climbing to be done in Squamish. Of course today we were here to slackline. HevyFest more_link_text




Aug 6

by Scott Rogers

As more and more people are setting up slacklines in parks and yards across the country, it is necessary to stress the importance of tree protection. In my experience, many people don’t use tree protection, while others use it to an unacceptable degree. In order to prolong the lives of the trees that we use, and to promote the good-natured acceptance of the sport of slacklining, it is important to take care of the trees that we are allowed to use.

There are several different types of tree protection being used today, carpet, blankets, cardboard, pipe insulation, padded or non-padded 2 inch webbing, and some other innovative and creative designs. Obviously some are better than others, but protection is extremely important both for the health of the tree and for the longevity of the webbing.

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Aug 4

by Scott Rogers

Harlan Walking the Spire, July 2008

Harlan Walking the Spire, July 2008

This year’s Slackline.com Lost Arrow Spire trip was full of fun and adventure, as every highlining trip should be. What started out as a dream for many became a reality for some as July 4th approached this year. Through talk and gossip it seemed that the annual trip to the spire would be crowded and unappealing. Fortunately, this wasn’t the case, as a very small group of individuals made the yearly pilgrimage to Yosemite.

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